Tag Archives: bat

Oregon Fish & Wildlife struggling to help non-game species

Western Pond Turtle

Western Pond Turtle. Courtesy USFWS.

If you’re reading this, you must care about non-game wildlife. But with a long history of relying on fishing and hunting fees to fund only Oregon’s game animals, non-game species have been left in the dust.

The series below, which appeared on Oregon Public Broadcasting, explains the problems and possible solutions to helping Oregon’s non-game wildlife before it’s too late.

Part 1: Wildlife Neglected: How Oregon Lost Track Of Species It’s Supposed To Protect

Part 2: Wildlife Neglected: Lacking Support, Conservation Falters At Oregon Fish and Wildlife

Part 3: Wildlife Neglected: To Fund Conservation, Oregon Hopes To Succeed Where Past Efforts Failed

Oregon Fish & Wildlife updates species conservation plan

By Tracie Hornung

Pygmy Rabbit

Pygmy Rabbit
Courtesy USFWS

Oregon Fish and Wildlife recently released the first update in 10 years to its Oregon Conservation Strategy.

The update identifies which habitats and non-game species have the greatest need for conservation, how they should be managed and how such management can be funded.

It lists nearly 300 species thought to be in decline in the state, including 58 bird and 29 mammalian species. Fish, amphibians, reptiles, invertebrates and plant species are also included.

Bird species include:

  • Common Nighthawk
  • Western Bluebird
  • Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Western Meadowlark
  • Marbled Murrelet
  • Northern Spotted Owl
  • Greater Sage-Grouse
  • Harlequin Duck

Mammals:

  • Several species of bats
  • Wolverine
  • Western Gray Squirrel
  • Pygmy Rabbit
  • Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep
  • Columbian White-tailed Deer
  • Gray Wolf
  • Harbor porpoise
  • Gray and Killer Whales

Find out more about the Oregon Conservation Strategy.

 

Conference provides loads of info to wildlife rehabilitators

Attendees settle in at the conference.

Attendees settle in at the conference.
Tracie Hornung photo

By Tracie Hornung

Dr. Jean Cypher and volunteers of Rowena Wildlife Center recently traveled to Salem to attend the one-day Third Biennial Wildlife Rehabilitation Conference, sponsored by the Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

Highlights included cutting-edge speakers in the wildlife health and rehabilitation community. Staff members, volunteers and students involved with wildlife rehabilitation centers in Oregon and Washington attended.

It’s always fun being in a room full of “animal people” and this conference was no exception. And it was encouraging to see a broad range of ages – from experts who have been working with wildlife for decades to young students and volunteers just starting out in the field.

A whole lot of information was packed into the eight-hour conference. Physical rehabilitation, pain management, behavior, and recent research pertaining to birds and mammals were among the many topics. But I found the three most interesting were on positive reinforcement training by Cascade Raptor Center, black bear rehabilitation at PAWS Wildlife Center in Washington state, and the ODFW presentation on white-nose syndrome in bats. Bat researchers are trying to find the answer to why white-nose syndrome “jumped” across the continental U.S. from Minnesota to Washington, where the syndrome was found this spring. See the ODFW press release.

Other topics at the conference were:

  •  Release Criteria
  •  Criteria for selection of education birds
  •  Biosecurity and zoonotic disease
  •  Raptor re-feeding syndrome
  •  Seabird facility design and air sampling
  •  Small mammal rehab
  •  Update on regulations

This conference was a worthwhile experience for wildlife rehabilitators, and it’s great that the state clearly values and encourages the work of independent rehabilitation centers.

Take a look at some of RWC’s beautiful patients

Rowena Wildlife Clinic is lucky to have volunteer Frank Rodrick of StrayShots taking photos of the clinic’s patients. Below is a small selection of his excellent photographs. Click on them to zoom in.