Tag Archives: offspring

How to help RWC: Oregon wildlife news

How you can help Rowena Wildlife Clinic

This is the clinic’s busiest time of year. The seasonal combination of newborn wildlife and increased human beings outside means that more animals are injured and found.

bald eagle

Young recovering bald eagle at Rowena Wildlife Clinic. Photo by Tracie Hornung

How can you help? First, if you find an animal in need please call the clinic first. And, after calling, if there is any way possible you can deliver the animal to the clinic that will help the clinic immensely. Volunteers, who all have other jobs and commitments, are sometimes hard pressed to make the time to retrieve the animal. The volunteer you speak to on the phone will be happy to explain how you can safely pick up and deliver the animal. See this link on our website to learn more.

And, of course, as a nonprofit organization, the clinic can always use donations. If you would like to contribute to help save injured wildlife, please visit our Donate page. If you choose to donate online, you don’t need a Paypal account to do so.

Harsh winter took heavy toll on wildlife in Oregon, western U.S.

Wildlife suffered higher than normal losses this winter in severe weather across the western United States, where the toll included the deaths of all known fawns in one Wyoming deer herd and dozens of endangered bighorn sheep in California.

Wildlife managers in Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Oregon and Washington also reported higher losses of animals in the wake of one of the coldest and snowiest winters in decades. Parts of the Rockies saw snowfall as late as mid-June.

See the rest of the story in the Oregonian.

Money for wildlife trapping reinstated in Oregon state budget committee

Despite looking for ways to cut  costs, Oregon’s legislative budget writers support spending nearly $1 million over the next two years to pay the state’s share of a program that helps fund wildlife trappers in dozens of counties across the state.

See the rest of the story in the Oregonian.

Disturbing graphic shows number of government wildlife kills in U.S.

Big game animals are killed in Oregon more than any state. See the graphic in the Oregonian.

See a wild animal baby alone?

By Tracie Hornung

Baby Red Fox

Baby Red Fox. Courtesy US Fish & Wildlife Service

This is the time of year when Rowena Wildlife Clinic and other wildlife rehabilitators get lots of calls from concerned people who believe a baby animal has been abandoned by its mother.

However, in many — if not most — cases mom is simply nearby foraging. If you take the baby away from where mom left it you may be creating a crisis that would not have existed.

Here’s a recent example: A woman’s well-meaning son found a young fawn. He picked it up, took it home, and his mother called the wildlife clinic. The clinic volunteer told them to search the area for a dead doe (presumably the mom) and if there was no sight of a dead deer in the area, to put the fawn back where he found it — and to watch and wait. If the mom did not come back after a certain period of time, she was either dead, or had abandoned the fawn for some reason, or the baby had already been away too long and its mom had given up on it.

The last scenario is the one you don’t want to create.  

Unfortunately, a myth still persists about wildlife: that the scent of a human on a wild animal baby will drive off the mom. That is incorrect.  (See this article by the Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game.) So don’t let that myth influence your behavior.

Another thing to keep in mind: Removing or “capturing” an animal from the wild and keeping it in captivity without a permit is against Oregon state law (OAR 635-044-0015), as is transporting many animals. Most other states have similar laws. Last year, seven people in Oregon were cited for such offenses.

To learn more, see this press release by the Oregon Dept. of Fish & Wildlife: Leave young wildlife in the wild. Also see ODFW’s Injured and Young Wildlife FAQs.

Postpone tree removal/pruning until fall or winter

By Tracie Hornung

Bird nest


Now that spring is here, one of the volunteers at the clinic says she hears chain saws in her neighborhood and worries that wildlife habitat will be destroyed in the process . . . which, of course, can spell doom for the animal — and possible offspring — whose home has suddenly disappeared.

In fact, that’s just what happened in the volunteers’ neighborhood. A tree trimmer cut down a tree containing the nest of a Western Gray Squirrel and one of the infant squirrels died. She notes that the clinic receives bird nests from felled trees every year, too.

Tree cutting

Don’t do this now!

Although you should wait until fall or winter to cut down trees to prevent destroying nests, you don’t have to curtail your other spring cleaning efforts as long as you use techniques that won’t harm your wild animal neighbors. Check out this “cheat sheet” by The Humane Society on how to do so.