Tag Archives: winter

How to help RWC: Oregon wildlife news

How you can help Rowena Wildlife Clinic

This is the clinic’s busiest time of year. The seasonal combination of newborn wildlife and increased human beings outside means that more animals are injured and found.

bald eagle

Young recovering bald eagle at Rowena Wildlife Clinic. Photo by Tracie Hornung

How can you help? First, if you find an animal in need please call the clinic first. And, after calling, if there is any way possible you can deliver the animal to the clinic that will help the clinic immensely. Volunteers, who all have other jobs and commitments, are sometimes hard pressed to make the time to retrieve the animal. The volunteer you speak to on the phone will be happy to explain how you can safely pick up and deliver the animal. See this link on our website to learn more.

And, of course, as a nonprofit organization, the clinic can always use donations. If you would like to contribute to help save injured wildlife, please visit our Donate page. If you choose to donate online, you don’t need a Paypal account to do so.

Harsh winter took heavy toll on wildlife in Oregon, western U.S.

Wildlife suffered higher than normal losses this winter in severe weather across the western United States, where the toll included the deaths of all known fawns in one Wyoming deer herd and dozens of endangered bighorn sheep in California.

Wildlife managers in Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Oregon and Washington also reported higher losses of animals in the wake of one of the coldest and snowiest winters in decades. Parts of the Rockies saw snowfall as late as mid-June.

See the rest of the story in the Oregonian.

Money for wildlife trapping reinstated in Oregon state budget committee

Despite looking for ways to cut  costs, Oregon’s legislative budget writers support spending nearly $1 million over the next two years to pay the state’s share of a program that helps fund wildlife trappers in dozens of counties across the state.

See the rest of the story in the Oregonian.

Disturbing graphic shows number of government wildlife kills in U.S.

Big game animals are killed in Oregon more than any state. See the graphic in the Oregonian.

Ski slope staff save freezing Barn Owl

by Tracie Hornung

As employees of Mt. Hood Meadows were on the ski slopes doing their jobs earlier this month, one of them spotted a nearly frozen Barn Owl in the snow. Meadows staffer Carrie Sidwell picked up the poor bird and skied down the slope with it in her arms!

Photo by Nick Adams

Photo by Nick Adams

The owl was transferred to Rowena Wildlife Clinic where rehabilitator Carol Rodrick began first response protocols, including putting it in an incubator to warm up. Although the bird did not appear injured, it was so cold and thin she was afraid it wouldn’t survive the night. But by morning it was standing up in the incubator and looking at her! 

Mt Hood Barn Owl

Photo by RWC

The ski staff understandably wanted to know why the owl was at such a high elevation, especially at this time of year: It’s probably because of Hood River County’s recent weather. It has been an exceptionally long, cold and snowy winter. And in its quest for food and warmth, the owl may have caught a warm updraft that swept it to the ski slope. Fortunately, the ski crew was in the right place at the right time!

The crew named the bird Cutty and it continues to be cared for at the clinic. Carol says she is “guardedly hopeful” that Cutty will recover.

“Thanks to Carrie, Wes and Nick,” Carol said in a Facebook posting, “for picking up the Barn Owl and transporting it to the clinic. We depend upon people like you to look out for our injured wild friends.”

Visit Cornell University’s All  About Birds website to learn more about Barn Owls

Feeding winter songbirds? Here are some tips

by Tracie Hornung

At first blush, feeding songbirds in winter sounds like nothing but a positive activity.

Darkened Junco. Courtesy USFWS. Dave Menke photo.

But I’ve heard the concern that if you start feeding songbirds in winter on a regular basis, you’re dooming them if you suddenly leave on vacation for a few weeks – after they’ve been “spoiled” by their human-supplied meals.

Another worry is that regular feeding of songbirds in winter may ultimately weaken them. Two studies in Europe and the U.K. have found that songbirds fed all winter produce fewer eggs, have fewer chicks fledge – and those that do have lower survival rates. This article in Cool Green Science explores some possible reasons. But because these findings were the result of only two studies, more research obviously needs to be done. 

Regarding leaving your birds for a frolic in the tropics, you can go guilt-free if you can coax a neighbor or friend to feed while you’re gone. Or if that’s not possible, gradually taper off the amount of food you’re putting out before you go. And according to the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, birds have adapted to changes in food sources and usually quickly revert to foraging in the wild.

snow

Tracie Hornung photo

If you want to know more about feeding birds in winter view Cornell’s “Bird Notes” publication on Winter Bird Feeding.