Tag Archives: wolves

All about bats; Comments sought on Oregon Wolf Plan

Little brown bat

Little brown bat

All about bats

By Tracie Hornung

Over the years, Rowena Wildlife Clinic has treated injured bats. I remember a time while working at the clinic when I saw one of  Dr. Cypher’s recovering bat patients. It was so small I don’t know how she was even able to attend to it. (Obviously, Dr. Cypher is very talented!) And happily, that tiny mammal was successfully released back into the wild.

Historically maligned, bats are finally getting some appreciation. As an article from Defenders of Wildlife states, “If you’ve ever enjoyed chocolate, mangoes, guava, wild bananas, or avocados, you might want to thank a bat!” That’s because bats are important pollinators. They even play a role in the production of rum and tequila. However, like many species of wildlife these days, some bat species face serious threats to their survival, including White-Nose Syndrome.

If you want to know more about Oregon’s bats, see the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife website. You can also learn more at Bat Conservation International.

Public comment sought on draft Wolf Management Plan for Oregon

The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife will hear public testimony about the draft Wolf Management Plan at its April 19-20 commission meeting in Astoria. Your comments can also be sent via email to odfw.commission@state.or.us.

This is a very important issue for wolf survival in Oregon!

Wolves confirmed in Wasco County

Courtesy ODFW.

Two wolves have been recorded in the same county as Rowena Wildlife Clinic!

Images of the two wolves in the northern portion of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains were captured on remote cameras of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in the Mt. Hood National Forest on January 4.

Read the ODFW press release about this sighting.

ODFW will be taking public comments April 19 and 20 in Astoria, Ore., on its draft Wolf Management Plan. Comments may also be sent via email to odfw.commission@state.or.us.

Some environmental organizations such as Defenders of Wildlife oppose the draft plan. Defenders says it will:

  • Make it easier to hunt wolves by allowing hunters and trappers to kill so-called “problem wolves,” including for declines in deer and elk populations;
  • Include a “vision statement” that gets a foot in the door for the future creation of a general hunting season;
  • Lower the threshold for livestock depredations that would trigger lethal removal of wolves; and
  • Fail to meaningfully address the impacts of poaching.

Also see this  Oregon Public Broadcasting report on the effectiveness — or lack thereof — of wolf kills.

Learn more about Oregon’s endangered gray wolves at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service website.

As Northwest states kill wolves, researchers cast doubt on if it works

Gray wolf (Canis lupus).

Gray wolf (Canis lupus). Photo by Gary Kramer, courtesy of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

See this story from Oregon Public Broadcasting about the effectiveness of wolf kills.

Among the fascinating results of the research done on this subject is this:

“Over seven years, researchers found the rate of sheep losses due to wolves was 3.5 times lower in an area where they used only non-lethal techniques, compared to an area open to lethal control.”

Learn more about Oregon’s endangered gray wolves at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service website.